Sacramento’s Farmers Markets Make a Difference in Safe Local Food

By Dawnie March 9, 2011

Farmers Markets could be considered the foundation of the safe food movement. There are more Farmers Markets than there are Walmarts. More than 50M people are influenced by their local farmers market.
Every Farmers Market has 50-100 vendors. If each market and Vendor or supporting Farmer reaches out to 100 people that is an immediate audience of 46,000,000 people.
How to take part in your community’s safe food movement and why:
  • Local food sources are fresher
  • Supporting Local food sources improves a regions sustainability
  • Take Action at your local farmers markets. Sometimes there are petitions there on safe food and water issues.
  • Many vendors at Farmers markets are Organic.
  • Plant a fruit tree in your yard.
  • Get in a CSA with the farmers for produce you love.

Check out your local famers market or what is growing in your area at this will let you look up farms in your area.

Sacramentans are lucky to have several choices when buying fresh flowers, fruit and vegetables from Northern California farmers.  A few are open all year long, while others are seasonal, mostly opening in May and running through October. Some are morning markets, while others are afternoon ones.

Farmers offer a variety of fruit and vegetables, but shoppers can also buy fresh tulips, irises and other flowers, organic cheeses, artisan breads and pastries, raw and seasoned nuts, cut and planted herbs, and other specialty food.


Sacramento Central
If you can manage to wake up early on a Sunday morning, make your way to the Sacramento Central farmers market where you’ll find many Asian produce. Shoppers will find great prices at this Midtown market, which is among the larger markets in the area.Guide Tip: Get here early. Since this is a popular market, on a few of my visits, some vendors ran out of food.

  • Location: 8th and W streets, underneath Highway 80
  • Hours: 8 a.m. to noon, open all year


Roosevelt Park
Roosevelt Park is among two farmer’s markets along P Street. Along the perimeter of the park, shoppers can buy vegetables, fruits, nuts, meats, herbs, flowers, baked goods and cheeses.

  • Location: 9th and P streets
  • Hours: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., from May through October

Fremont Park
Just down the street from Roosevelt Park is Fremont Park. Vendors are spread along the perimeter of the park.Guide Tip: Finding a parking space can be a challenge at both of these parks. If you’re lucky, you’ll find a metered spot. Remember to keep track of the time to avoid getting a ticket.

  • Location: 16th and P streets
  • Hours: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., from May through October


Casear Chavez
Caesar Chavez Memorial Plaza is abuzz with shoppers from area office buildings at this downtown market.

  • Location: 10th and J streets, in front of City Hall
  • Hours: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., from May through October


Downtown Plaza

Tucked away in the walkway between Macy’s and the Holiday Inn is the Downtown Plaza farmer’s market where you can buy fruit, vegetables, bread, olive oil, flowers and nuts.Guide Tip: Parking can be tough in this area. Your best bet is to park in the Downtown Plaza West Garage on L Street, which is right next to the market.

  • Location: 4th and K streets
  • Hours: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., from May thru October

  • Hours: 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. all year long this is a list of farmers markets